Susan Landau

CV
Susan Landau works at the intersection of cybersecurity, national security, law, and policy. Her insights on encryption policy, law-enforcement requirements for embedding surveillance within communication infrastructures, and securing private-sector telecommunications have deeply influenced policy makers and scholars. Landau's book Surveillance or Security? The Risks Posed by New Wiretapping Technologies (MIT Press) won the 2012 Surveillance Studies Book Prize, while Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption (MIT Press), co-authored with Whitfield Diffie, won the 1998 Donald McGannon Communication Policy Research Award, and the 1999 IEEE-USA Award for Distinguished Literary Contributions Furthering Public Understanding of the Profession (revised edition, 2007). Landau has testified to Congress, written for the Washington Post, Science, and Scientific American, and frequently appeared on NPR and BBC. Professor of Cybersecurity Policy in the Department of Social Science and Policy Studies at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Visiting Professor in Computer Science at University College London, Landau has been a senior staff Privacy Analyst at Google, a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems, and a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Wesleyan University. Landau was inducted into the Cybersecurity Hall of Fame in 2015. She was a 2012 Guggenheim fellow, a 2010-2011 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and the recipient of the 2008 Women of Vision Social Impact Award; she is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association for Computing Machinery.

 
     
 

MIT Press
Amazon
 

MIT Press
Amazon
 
     
  Biographical Information

Susan Landau works at the intersection of cybersecurity, national security, law, and policy. During the Crypto Wars of the 1990s, her insights on how government encryption policy skewed civil society and business needs for security helped win the argument for a relaxation of cryptographic export controls. Beginning in the early 2000s, Landau was an early leading voice in the argument that law-enforcement requirements for embedding surveillance within communication infrastructures created long-term national-security risks. Her position that securing private-sector telecommunications was in the national-security interest ran contrary to public thinking at the time and had strong impact on policy makers and scholars. Landau's book Surveillance or Security? The Risks Posed by New Wiretapping Technologies (MIT Press) won the 2012 Surveillance Studies Book Prize. Her book of Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption (MIT Press), co-authored with Whitfield Diffie, won the 1998 Donald McGannon Communication Policy Research Award, and the 1999 IEEE-USA Award for Distinguished Literary Contributions Furthering Public Understanding of the Profession (revised edition, 2007). Landau has testified to Congress and frequently briefed U.S. and European governments on encryption, surveillance, and cybersecurity issues. She has written for the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Christian Science Monitor, Science, and Scientific American, and has frequently appeared on NPR and BBC. In addition to her focus on security and privacy risks of communications surveillance, Landau has done research on attribution, identity, critical infrastructure protection, and digital rights management. Her earlier technical work in algebraic algorithms and symbolic computation, which brought various exponential-time problems into polynomial time, has had impact on cryptography.

Landau is Professor of Cybersecurity Policy in the Department of Social Science and Policy Studies at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and a Visiting Professor in Computer Science at University College London. Prior to returning to academia, Landau was a Senior Staff Privacy Analyst at Google and a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems. At Sun, Landau worked on digital rights management, privacy and security aspects of federated identity management, and cryptographic export control. Landau has been a faculty member in computer science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Wesleyan University and held visiting positions at Harvard, Yale, Cornell, and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute at Berkeley. She spent many wonderful summers teaching at Hampshire College Summer Studies in Mathematics, a program for high-ability high school students (cf. Supporting a National Treasure).

Landau is a member of the Forum on Cyber Resilience, a National Academies roundtable, and recently served on a National Academies study on bulk signals intelligence collection, Bulk Collection of Signals Intelligence: Technical Options. Landau is associate editor in chief for IEEE Security and Privacy, area editor for political and policy perspectives for the Journal of Cyber Security, and contributing editor for Lawfareblog. She has served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the advisory committee for the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board, and the Commission on Cyber Security for the 44th Presidency. She was section board member for the Communications of the ACM from 2008-2014 and associate editor of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society from 1994-2001. Landau is active in issues related to women in science. With Terry Benzel and Hilarie Orman, she has organized security research meetings for women and members of underrepresented groups. Landau started researcHers, a mailing list for women computer science researchers in academia, industry and government labs and with Elaine Weyuker, created the ACM-W Athena Lectureship, an award celebrating outstanding women researchers. In 2008 Landau co-chaired the MIT Celebration of Women in Math meeting. She has served on the executive committee of ACM-W and the Computing Research Association Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRAW).

Landau was inducted into the Cybersecurity Hall of Fame in 2015. She is a 2012 Guggenheim fellow, a 2010-2011 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and the recipient of the 2008 Women of Vision Social Impact Award. Landau is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association for Computing Machinery. She received her BA from Princeton, her MS from Cornell, and her PhD from MIT.

 
   
  [top]  
     
     
     
     
  Publications
(Publications are arranged by subject and may be listed in more than one category if appropriate.)
 
     
 

Cybersecurity

Cryptography

Privacy

Identity Management

Digital Rights Management

Symbolic Computation

  • S. Landau, "Computations with Algebraic Numbers," in J. Grabmeier, E. Kaltofen, and V. Weispfennig (eds.), Computer Algebra Handbook, Spring Verlag, 2003, pp. 18-19.
  • S. Landau and N. Immerman, Embedding Linkages in Integer Lattices, Algorithmica, Vol. 43, No. 5, May 2000, pp. 115-120. A preliminary version appeared in MSI Workshop on Computational Geometry, October, 1994.
  • S. Landau, Compute and Conjecture, Commentary (In My Opinion), Notices of the American Mathematical Society, Feb. 1999, p. 189.
  • S. Landau, : Four Different Views, Mathematical Intelligencer, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Fall 1998), pp. 55-60.
  • D. Kozen, S. Landau, and R. Zippel, Decomposition of Algebraic Functions, Journal of Symbolic Computation, Vol. 22 (1996), pp. 235-246. A preliminary version appeared in Algorithmic Number Theory Symposium (1994).
  • S. Landau, How to Tangle with a Nested Radical, Mathematical Intelligencer, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Spring 1994), pp. 49-55.
  • S. Landau, Finding Maximal Subfields, SIGSAM Bulletin, Vol. 27, No. 3 (1993), pp. 4-8.
  • S. Landau, Simplification of Nested Radicals, SIAM J. of Comput., Vol. 21 (1992), pp. 85-110. A preliminary version appeared in Thirtieth Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science (1989), pp. 314-319.
  • S. Landau, A Note on `Zippel Denesting,' J. Symb. Comput., Vol. 13 (1992), pp. 41-47.
  • J. Cremona and S. Landau, Shrinking Lattice Polyhedra, SIAM J. of Discrete Math, Vol. 3, No. 3 (1990), pp. 338-348. A preliminary version appeared in Proceedings of the First ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (1990), pp. 188-193.
  • D. Kozen and S. Landau, Polynomial Decomposition Algorithms, J. Symb. Comput., Vol. 7 (1989), pp. 445-456. Appeared in a different version as J. von zur Gathen, D. Kozen and S. Landau, "Functional Decomposition of Polynomials" Twenty-Eight Annual IEEE Symposium on the Foundations of Computer Science (1989), pp. 314-319.
  • S. Landau, Factoring Polynomials Quickly, Notices of the American Mathematical Society, [Special Article Series], vol. 34, No. 1 (1987), pp. 3-8.
  • S. Landau and G. Miller, Solvability by Radicals is in Polynomial Time, J. Comput. Sys. Sci., Vol. 30, No. 2 (1985), pp. 179-208. A preliminary version appeared in Fifteenth ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (1983), pp. 140-151.
  • S. Landau, Factoring Polynomials over Algebraic Number Fields, SIAM J. of Comput., Vol. 14, No. 1 (1985), pp. 184-195.
  • S. Landau, Polynomial Time Algorithms for Galois Groups, Proceedings of the Int'l. Symposium on Symbolic and Algebraic Computation (1984), Spring Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science, No. 174, pp. 225-236.

Complexity

  • N. Immerman and S. Landau, The Complexity of Iterated Multiplication, Information and Computation Vol. 116, No. 1 (1995), pp. 103-116. A preliminary version appeared in Fourth Annual Structure in Complexity Conference (1989), pp. 104-111.
  • S. Landau and N. Immerman, The Similarities (and Differences) between Polynomials and Integers, Int'l. Conf. on Number Theoretic and Algebraic Methods in Computer Science (1993), pp. 57-59.

Women in Science

Miscellaneous

 
     
  [top]  
   
     
     
     
 

Professional Activities (recent)

 
     
     
  [top]  
   
     
     
     
     
 

Honors and Awards

 
   
  [top]  
     
     
     
     
 

Contact Information

Phone: 413-259-2018

 
     
     
  [top]  
     
     
  Copyright © 2016 Susan Landau | Site Design by Silvana.Net